Our Work
Since 1999, a total of 284 Scholarships have been awarded.

In January 2015:
  • we had 62 scholars in secondary education thanks to the generosity of sponsors who wish to give young Kenyans hope and the opportunity to rise above poverty through education.
  • A further 76 scholars were being supported through degree and diploma courses at universities and colleges in Kenya, mainly around Nairobi.
  • 82 scholars have now graduated and are beginning to make their way in their chosen careers.
  • 34 have had their scholarship withdrawn at different stages for a variety of reasons.
Who has Qualified for a Scholarship?
Until 2015, secondary scholarships have been awarded in January when interviews were held at Comboni Polytechnic in Gilgil. Only those who produced the correct paperwork were allowed through the gate. An extensive questionnaire had to be completed, assisted by some of our older scholars, and each candidate was then interviewed by a panel consisting of representatives of the trustees and trusted local representatives. Around 20 bright, needy boys and girls were then selected from about 50 who had been allowed through the security gate.

Many of those selected are orphans or abandoned children.

In line with trustees' policy, we have given some priority to applicants who have not taken the Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) exams more than once. Our aim to take 50% of boys and girls has always proved unattainable due mainly to local social and cultural reasons. The interview board has, however, made some allowance for this in their final selections.

View a diagram of the process by clicking here >>

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Tertiary Education
In modern-day Kenya unemployment is very high, especially in the rural areas of the Rift Valley where the majority are very poor subsistence farmers eking out a living on a small plot of scrubland. To ensure that our scholars get the best possible chance of good employment, and the many benefits to the family and community that come with it, it is vitally important that they are educated beyond school level.

It is indicative of the success of the scheme that most scholars have qualified for university or college courses. Approximately 33% of our school leavers are now undertaking degree courses. While awaiting a university or college placement, LLSF actively encourages scholars to fill their time usefully by acting as assistant teachers at one of our primary schools and paying them 'the going rate'. This is, of course, very exciting because it is the first time any of them have earned a proper salary and by doing so they gain a measure of independence.

Young Kenyans usually have to wait between 6 and 18 months before starting tertiary courses. Many potential young undergraduates "drop out" because of this delay. To reduce this risk LLSF actively encourages scholars to fill their time usefully by acting as assistant teachers at one of our primary schools and paying them 'the going rate'. This is, of course, very exciting because it is the first time any of them have earned a proper salary and by doing so they gain a measure of independence.

This idea has proved extremely popular with scholars, teachers, pupils and parents. They are able to save for a mobile phone, a bicycle and decent clothes and our scholars almost immediately put something back into their own country. They are made to feel that they have "value" and they keep their brains in trim while waiting for the next phase of their own education. A number of new scholars have attributed their success to the teaching of their older schoolmates. It is a "win - win" situation!

As part of our scholars' preparation for the world of work, LLSF also pays for 120 hours of computer module training. This gives the scholars a general idea of what a computer can do and, most importantly, scholars are given an email address through which they can keep in touch with trustees and fellow scholars. The Chairman of the charity grants permission to undertake a tertiary course only if full details, costs and accreditation are provided. Then an application to the appropriate authorities can be made. During this process the Langalanga Scholars Association (LLSA) officers have proved very helpful in offering advice on what choices are available, how to proceed with applications, where to live and how to organise themselves. Many scholars will never have been to Nairobi so they need all the help they can get.

The Langalanga Scholars' Association  
The Langalanga Scholarship Professionals  
Results
The results of our Form 4 Leavers this year continue to show their motivation and commitment to do well. Of our 20 scholars, we had a total of 5 ‘A’-s, an amazing achievement in Kenya, and 5 ‘B+’s. These scholars now wait to be allocated competitive places at Government universities. Others will apply for good, recognised vocational diploma courses. Sadly, 3 scholars failed to meet the charity’s high benchmark for tertiary support but they remain members of the Langalanga Scholars Association and are entitled to their advice and support.

Click here to see a summary of our results.
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